The letters of our thoughts are the ideas present in our mind before they come to realization . . . Thoughts that are, yet not felt . . . The words of the subconscious . . . of the soul . . .

These are the LETTERS OF MY THOUGHTS.

Monday, August 23, 2010

The Stunning Work of Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii.

I've been familiar with some of the work of Prokudin-Gorskii for some time now. Yesterday I saw photo essay of his work on the Boston Globe making its way around the tubes . . . So I figured I'd repost some of my favorites and give you guys a link to the rest of them . . .

 

Enjoy! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See the rest of those on the Boston Globe and enjoy the entire collection from the Library of Congress.

 

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11 comments:

shavuatov said...

These are wonderful images and so very poignant. Thank you for linking to the Boston Globe and the Library of Congress too.

Shavua Tov

rachel

shira said...

Thank you for sharing these wonderful photos.

sarabonne said...

3rd pic down was nice, I like the lighting.

הצעיר שלמה בן רפאל לבית שריקי ס"ט said...

Old news! I think it's stupid that people are just finding out about it now.. Been around a hundred years y'know! : P

הצעיר שלמה בן רפאל לבית שריקי ס"ט said...

I also think it's stupid that this "Gorskii" (pun) had color photography in Russia in 1910, and in america they didn't have any color pictures till the 40's (more or less)...

Mottel said...

-Glad you guys like:

-Shlomo: I wrote clearly that the pictures have been floating around the interwebs (and before that in books and archives) for years . . . I even blogged about one of thew shots in 2006. What does it matter? The pictures are still great!
As to color - it's a very different technology.

Anonymous said...

Quiz: what was the Rebbe's most famous diyuk in the wording of Moshe ben AR?

Jew Wishes said...

Thank you for bringing these images and the links to our attention.

They are so poignant, so filled with humaneness...

rotem@israel said...

he worked with negatives and after he had print-he coloured them just the way artist paint his picture. i have no another explanation for that.

Mottel said...

Nope - no coloring things in as stated in his wikipedia entry:

"His process used a camera that took a series of three monochrome pictures in sequence, each through a different-coloured filter. By projecting all three monochrome pictures using correctly coloured light, it was possible to reconstruct the original colour scene. Any stray movement within the camera's field of view showed up in the prints as multiple "ghosted" images, since the red, green and blue images were taken of the subject at slightly different times"

Anonymous said...

A goot genetched yuhr